basicadventuring101:

Our pilot teaser trailer has been released! And even more importantly, so has the date for the pilot episode: April 16, 2014! 

Please like, subscribe, and share! It’s time to get the word out so that everyone can see what a team of LARP-lovers can accomplish.


I’m turning into that person who posts nonstop photos of their child. Err..I mean cat.

I’m turning into that person who posts nonstop photos of their child. Err..I mean cat.


I’ve been dealing with depression for a long time, but only just started to address it back in November. This is an update on my decision to live a happier life.

Previous vlog about depression: http://youtu.be/9JZrqmlB_0Q


stephanietwilleylarper:

girlwithtea:

The first generation of caravans at Nero Canada - a fantastico alternative to tents.  My mum made them, and keeps making them, with larpers and artists and all sorts of people.  They were even used on set for Defiance.
(My mum’s website is thisaway: http://www.daphnescaravans.com )

I wanna share this with you guys

stephanietwilleylarper:

girlwithtea:

The first generation of caravans at Nero Canada - a fantastico alternative to tents.  My mum made them, and keeps making them, with larpers and artists and all sorts of people.  They were even used on set for Defiance.

(My mum’s website is thisaway: http://www.daphnescaravans.com )

I wanna share this with you guys


larp-grove:

I don’t know much about alienskin, but I saw this and had to share.

(via larpgirl)


vega-ofthe-lyre:

Details | Zuhair Murad

Dress armor? Huh.

(via liviniathornley)


Claire’s fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST

shoomlah:

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So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

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It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

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The Agent/Author Conversations: Why Main Characters Need to Drive Your Story

lettersandlight:

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As the "Now What?" Months continue, we’ll be hearing from agents, editors, self-publishers, and authors about the road towards sharing your work. We’ve asked several authors to interview their agents for a peek behind the curtain at what it takes to write and sell a book. Today, Kelly Loy Gilbert interviews her agent, Adriann Ranta, about typical critiques, beta readers, and more:

Kelly Loy Gilbert: When I come out of my writing cave with a new draft, one thing that’s always a big transition for me is that process of opening it up to other voices. I tend not to show anyone what I’m working on as I’m doing it, so for months the only voice I’ve been hearing has been my own. But, of course, if you’re going take a story out into the world, whether that’s sharing it with a reader or an agent or editor, whether that’s self-publishing or traditional publishing, suddenly there will be a whole chorus of voices surrounding your previously shy story.

Adriann, what have you learned about the revision process from the agenting side?

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Why Self-Publishing Is a Craft… And How You Can Master It

lettersandlight:

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The “Now What?” Months are here! In 2014, we’ll be bringing you advice from authors who published their NaNo-novels, editors, agents, and more to help you polish November’s first draft until it gleams. Today, Guy Kawasaki, former chief evangelist for Apple, and author of APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur, shares why he prefers the term “artisanal publishing”:

What led you to write APE?

I felt so much pain because I self-published my previous book, What the Plus!. In the words of Steve Jobs, “There must be a better way.”

When I could discover no better explanation of self-publishing, I decided to write the book about it to help everyone else going through the process.

You’ve coined the phrase “artisanal publishing”—can you elaborate on what that means?

Read More